No Title

2006at5818 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1956 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Samuel Matley & Sons
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
Given by the Calico Printers' Association
date_end
1818-12-31
date_start
1818-01-01
date_text
1818 (made)
descriptive_line
Furnishing fabric of roller-printed cotton, printed by Samuel Matley & Sons, Hodge, 1818
dimensions
Height: 30.5 cm, Width: 40.6 cm, Height: 12 in, Width: 16 in
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Ilett's green, patented in 1809, is used. Printed by Samuel Matley & Son, Hodge, Cheshire
id
29419
label
British Galleries: Joseph Ilett patented his permanent dye in 1809 'for producing fast greens on cotton'. Before its introduction green was produced by placing blue over yellow. It was one of a number of dyeing innovations based on chemical discoveries made in the early 1800s. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T21:25:58.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T21:25:58.000Z
latitude
41.498075
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 7
longitude
-72.901864
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Roller-printed cotton
museum_number
CIRC.248-1956
museum_number_token
circ2481956
object_number
O34151
object_type
Furnishing fabric
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Furnishing fabric of roller-printed cotton in yellow, buff and single green. The pattern includes a design of stripes of leaves and flowers on honeycomb ground.
place
Hodge
primary_image_id
2006AT5818
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The pattern of this printed cotton has been created with an engraved metal roller. Roller-printing on textiles had been introduced in the late 18th century, at first mainly for small-patterned dress fabrics. By the time this cotton was printed in about 1818, the technique had been developed for much larger-scale designs, and by the 1830s roller-printing had largely replaced block-printing in the production of fashionable furnishings. Materials & Making The development of roller-printing coincided with a radical transformation in the dyestuffs available for printing on cotton. Until the beginning of the 19th century, printing had been based on the use of vegetable dyes. In Britain, France and Germany new chemical processes were developed and mineral colours produced which transformed the palette of colours available to the printer. The green dye used on this cotton was a British discovery, but most innovations were made on the Continent and had to be rediscovered by chemists in British printworks. Places This cotton was printed by Matley & Son, a family of calico printers. Samuel Matley had worked at Red Bank and at Scotland Bridge in Manchester before taking over the factory at Hodge near Mottram, Cheshire, in 1805. The firm continued in production there until 1870.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
furnishing-fabric-samuel-matley-sons
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1818
year_start
1818