Aureus of Crispina

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1910 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
'Salting Bequest (A. 70 to A. 1029-1910) / Murray Bequest (A. 1030 to A. 1096-1910)'. In: List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum (Department of Architecture and Sculpture). London: Printed under the Authority of his Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Limited, East Harding Street, EC, p. 114
collection_code
SCP
credit
Bequeathed by Mr George Salting
date_end
0183-12-31
date_start
0180-01-01
date_text
180-183 AD (made)
descriptive_line
Coin (aureus), gold, head of Crispina Augusta / Venus with Victory, Roman, ca. 180-183 AD
dimensions
Diameter: 2.03 cm, Weight: 7.35 g
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
From the Salting bequest.
id
258545
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T10:53:04.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T10:53:04.000Z
latitude
41.903111
location
In Storage
longitude
12.49576
marks
'CRISPINA AVGVSTA' 'VENVS . FELIX'
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold
museum_number
A.692-1910
museum_number_token
a6921910
object_number
O310870
object_type
Coin
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold coin. Obverse: Inscription. Head of Crispini to right. Reverse: Inscription. Venus seated to left, holding a figure of Victory and a sceptre. Under the throne a dove.
place
Rome
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This coin depicts the head of Empress Crispina Augusta, the wife of the Emperor Commodus. The aureus was an ancient Roman gold coin, issued from around the 1st century BC up to the 4th century AD. One aureus was worth 25 silver denarii. The denarius was a small silver coin and the principal silver coin issued in the ancient Roman currency system from the late 3rd century BC until the early 3rd century AD. The use of the portrait is the most persistent and usually the most striking feature of coins of the Roman Empire. Particularly during the first three centuries of the Empire's existence (27 BC-AD 284) images of historically recorded (and some unrecorded) people appear on the majority of coins. Roman coins acted as a vehicle for the quick and wide-reaching spread of propagandic images of Imperial power, at the centre of which was the embodiment of Rome and all that its Empire stood for, the Emperor himself. Roman coins survive in very large numbers and are frequently found right across Europe, reaching the furthest corners of the Empire.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
aureus-of-crispina-coin-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Aureus of Crispina
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
183
year_start
180