No Title

2006au5783 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1921 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
see also IM.218, IM. 220-222-1921 Guy, John: 'Indian Temple Sculpture', London, V &A Publication 2007, p 30. pl. 29. ISBN 971851775095 Guy, John (ed.). ‘L’Escultura en els Temples Indis: L’Art de la Devocio’, Barcelona : Fundacio ‘La Caixa’, 2007. p.158, cat.116. ISBN 9788476649466
collection_code
SSEA
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
ca. 200 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Reliquary from Stupa No 2, Sonari, central India, steatite, c 200 BCE
dimensions
Diameter: 7.125 in, Height: 16.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
: L’escultura en els temples indis: l’art de la devocio (CaixaForum, Barcelona 27/07/2007-18/11/2007)
gallery
South-East Asia, room 47b
historical_context_note
Vase shaped relic casket of mottled steatite, discovered by Gen A Cunningham and Gen Maisey in about 1851, in the Stupa No 2, at Sonari, 6 miles SW of Sanchi, Bhopal State, Central India. It contained the small relic caskets Nos 220 and 222-1921, as well as a quantity of calcined bone-ash and a piece of sandal-wood (?). The casket may date from about the year 200 BC and the stupa may be a few years later. The casket is shaped to resemble the seed-capsule of a lotus (lota-shape), of which the small cover forms the central corona. It was turned on the lathe, and then carved in low relief with bands of lotus-petals on the shoulder and lower part of the body, whilst on the upper body is a broad zone divided into eight rectangular compartments in each of which is an elephant, or a horse, a deer or a winged lion(?). The present contents of the casket consist of powdered bone-ash, and a piece of wood.
historical_significance
history_note
Willis, Michael. Buddhist Reliquaries from Ancient India. London : British Museum Press, 2000. ISBN 0 7141 1492 8. p. no.85 and fig.91. 1921/3021,
id
25110
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T21:03:31.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T21:03:31.000Z
latitude
23.970791
location
South-East Asia, room 47b, case 1
longitude
78.428879
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Steatite
museum_number
IM.219-1921
museum_number_token
im2191921
object_number
O25176
object_type
Reliquary
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Madhya Pradesh
primary_image_id
2006AU5783
production_note
Sonari (Sanchi), Madhya Pradesh, central India
production_type
public_access_description
It was customary from the time of the Buddha’s death to preserve and venerate his relics. Under the great Mauryan emperor Asoka (circa 268-233 BC), a convert to Buddhism and an energetic patron of the faith, a series of stupas, relic mounds, were erected across the empire, marking sites of significance in the Buddha’s life. This practice continued, and this relic container is believed to have been interned around 200 BC. Relic deposits of this period usually represented re-deposits of original Buddha corporal relics. This relic container was excavated at Sonari, a Buddhist monastery six miles south-west of Sanchi, by A Cunningham and F C Maisey in 1851. Stupa No 2 at Sonari was found to contain three miniature reliquaries – two in steatite and one in rock crystal - as well as a quantity of powdered bone-ash and a piece of wood. This steatite reliquary casket is shaped to resemble a lotus bud, with incised petals decorating the lower half of the reliquary. It was turned on the lathe and then carved in low relief with bands of lotus-petals on the shoulder and lower part of the body, whilst on the upper body is a broad zone divided into eight rectangular compartments in each of which is an elephant, horse, deer or winged lion, typical motifs of the Mauryan period. It was first published by A Cunningham in The Bhilsa Topes in 1854.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
reliquary-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-07T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-196
year_start
-205