No Title

2006au5777 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1948 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Irwin, J., 'Late Mauryan or early Sunga ring-stones', Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, April 1951, pp.1-3 ed Guy, J., L'Escultura en els Temples Indis: L'art de la Devocio, Fundacio'la Caixa', Barcelona, 2007, No. 9, p. 52 Guy, John. Indian Temple Sculpture. London : V&A Publications, 2007. p.25. pl.19. ISBN 9781851775095 Willis, Michael. Buddhist Reliquaries from Ancient India. London : British Museum Press, 2000. ISBN 0 7141 1492 8. pp.71-2, fn.1. Guy, John (ed.). L’Escultura en els Temples Indis: L’Art de la Devocio. Barcelona : Fundacio ‘La Caixa’, 2007. ISBN 9788476649466. p.52, cat. 9.
collection_code
SSEA
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
3rd century BC-2nd century BC (made)
descriptive_line
Ring stone, polished sandstone, Taxila, Pakistan, 3rd-2nd century BC
dimensions
Diameter: 8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
: L’escultura en els temples indis: l’art de la devocio (CaixaForum, Barcelona 27/07/2007-18/11/2007)
gallery
South-East Asia, room 47b
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Ring-stones of this type have been recorded across northern India from Taxila in the north-west, across the Punjab through to Patna in the East. The uniformity of the material and the designs, together with the portable nature of the objects, has led scholars to suggest the possibility of one centre of production from which they would be sold as luxury merchandise along the major trade routes of northern India. A probable centre for this production was Pataliputra (modern-day Patna), the capital of the Mauryan state of Magadha. Their purpose remains an enigma. The female figures may be symbolic of a fertility goddess. The tri-partite flowering plant may evoke the tri-ratna Buddhist symbol, while the square patterning bears a resemblance to the motifs on Buddha's throne pedestal at Bodhgaya.
id
25029
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T21:03:09.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T21:03:09.000Z
latitude
30.8603
location
South-East Asia, room 47b, case 4
longitude
72.374298
marks
materials
,
materials_techniques
Polished sandstone
museum_number
IS.82-1948
museum_number_token
is821948
object_number
O25059
object_type
Ring stone
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Ring stone carved on the convex interior surface with female figures alternating with tripartite flowering stems, evoking the Buddhist triratna symbol. Above this on the upper surface are two concentric carved bands with a quatrefoil lozenge design between three borders of diagonal hatchings in alternate directions. Ring-stones of this type have been recorded across northern India from Taxila in the north-west to Patna in the East.
place
Taxila
primary_image_id
2006AU5777
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Ring stones of this type are an enigma and their intended function remains unknown. Their form and decoration suggest links to female fertility symbolism. The inner face of this stone is finely carved in low relief with female figures alternating with tripartite flowering stems, evoking the Buddhist ‘triratna’ symbol. The quatrefoil lozenge pattern is also seen on the Buddha’s ‘vajrasana’ throne seat at Bodhgaya. There it suggests a textile-inspired design. It has been suggested that ring stones may have served as moulds. Goldsmiths might have used them to produce ear ornaments, such as those seen on ‘yaksha’ (nature-spirits) figures of this period and of a type which continued into the Kushan period (1st-3rd century AD). Ring stones have been recorded across northern India, from Taxila in the north-west, the Punjab, to Patna in the east. They share a uniformity of materials and of design and a consistently high quality of carving. This, together with their portability, raises the possibility that they were produced in one centre and circulated as a form of luxury good along the early northern trade routes. A strong candidate as a production centre must be Pataliputra (modern Patna), the capital of the Mauryan kingdom of Magadha.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ring-stone-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-07T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
carving
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-100
year_start
-300