Sculpture

2010ea0654 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1951 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Notes attached: "Mother Goddess, Terracotta, Sheikh Yusuf, Gandhara, Pakistan, c.1st century BC-1st century AD" "Mother Goddess, Terracotta, Charsada-Shaikan Dheri, Pakistan, c.2nd century B.C, IS20a-1951 D.H.Gordon: J.I.S.O.A. Vol. XI 1943, Pl.XVI No.3. Guy, John (ed.). ‘L’Escultura en els Temples Indis: L’Art de la Devocio’, Barcelona : Fundacio ‘La Caixa’, 2007. ISBN 9788476649466. p.49, cat. 5.
collection_code
SSEA
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
3rd century BC-1st century BC (made)
descriptive_line
Mother goddess spout from a vessel, terracotta, Gandhara, Pakistan, 3rd-1st century BCE
dimensions
Height: 11 cm, Width: 5.8 cm, Depth: 3.5 cm maximum
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
: L’escultura en els temples indis: l’art de la devocio (CaixaForum, Barcelona 27/07/2007-18/11/2007)
gallery
Ceramics Study Galleries, Asia & Europe, room 137
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
24887
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T21:02:41.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T21:02:41.000Z
latitude
30.441851
location
Ceramics Study Galleries, Asia & Europe, room 137, case R, shelf 3
longitude
69.359703
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Terracotta
museum_number
IS.47-1951
museum_number_token
is471951
object_number
O24851
object_type
Sculpture
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Spout in the form of a female figure, the breasts each have holes to act as conduits for water.
place
Pakistan
primary_image_id
2010EA0654
production_note
Charsadda Shaikhan Dheri, Gandhara, Pakistan
production_type
public_access_description
This diminutive figure is robustly modelled in fired clay in the from of a seated woman, with her two hands supporting her breasts, which are open. This fragmentary object once formed the spout to a terracotta vessel. The openings are so positioned that the liquid would have flowed as if from the figurine’s breasts. One may speculate that a vessel with such a pouring device might have been intended for worship ceremony requiring ritual lustration. The pouring, as if from a woman’s breasts, would evoke the bringing of fertility, nourishment and succour. The figure is seated with her feet crossed and wears a skirt length above her knees; jewellery in the from of a necklace or torque, bracelets and earplugs and a headdress are all modelled in applied clay. This device of breasts as fountains is seen in the late Classical world, and though not common in the medieval Indian world, does appear elsewhere in the later Hindu world, at ritual bathing places in Java and Bali.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
sculpture-sculpture-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Sculpture
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-1
year_start
-300