No Title

2006bc9347 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1908 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
date_end
1800-12-31
date_start
1700-01-01
date_text
18th century (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
[Sword] Length: 28.1 cm blade [Scabbard] Length: 45.1 cm overall
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
204
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:18:51.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:18:51.000Z
latitude
37.487598
location
In Storage
longitude
139.838287
marks
materials
materials_techniques
[Sword] Forged steel [Scabbard] Lacquered wood, covered in ray skin, with metal fittings of iron and patinated copper
museum_number
685 to B-1908
museum_number_token
6851908
object_number
O92965
object_type
Sword and scabbard
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Unsigned Japanese companion sword (wakizashi) in an unusually decorated scabbard
place
Japan
primary_image_id
2006BC9347
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This is an unusually mounted Japanese companion sword, known as a wakizashi. The blade is unsigned and very worn. The scabbard is covered with lacquered rayskin and decorated with what appear to be miscellaneous pieces of sword-fittings (mostly of iron and patinated copper) which have no coherent theme and seem randomly applied. It is possible that they were added to the scabbard after manufacture. After 1876 when the samurai were abolished as a class and the wearing of swords was prohibited there was very little further demand for swords and sword-fittings. Many craftsmen turned their hands to the newly arrived market of foreigners who avidly collected anything Japanese. Daggers were worn both by samurai and non-samurai including, increasingly, the merchant classes. Merchants tended towards gaudier mountings for their blades so the unusual decoration of this wakizashi would indicate that it was not for a samurai, but it is so oddly decorated that we must assume it was intended for sale to a western visitor to Japan in the late 19th century.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
sword-and-scabbard-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1800
year_start
1700