No Title

2013gt7110 jpg l

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Acquired in 1935 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
Purchased with the assistance of The Art Fund, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee
date_end
date_start
date_text
525 BC-475 BC (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 26 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
Chinese art (Burlington Fine Arts Club 01/01/1915-31/12/1915)
gallery
China, room 44
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
19768
label
Lidded bowl (dou) Eastern Zhou dynasty 525-475 BC This vessel is called a dou, the same word for 'bean'. Historians believe the vessel was a container for beans. Cast bronze Museum no. M.9-1935 [2007]
last_checked
2014-08-29T20:40:45.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T20:40:45.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
China, room 44, case 2
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
bronze
materials_techniques
Bronze
museum_number
M.9:1, 2-1935
museum_number_token
m91935
object_number
O18894
object_type
Lidded vessel
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Vessel composed of a hemispherical bowl on a high stem with splayed foot and a lid. The bowl has two ring handles and the lid three. The surface is decorated with small protruding beads on a background of tiny interlaced snake-like creatures.
place
China
primary_image_id
2013GT7110
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This traditional vessel, called a dou in Chinese, was produced between 525-475 BC during the Eastern Zhou period (771-221 BC). Vessels of this sort had been produced since the Neolithic period (5000-1700 BC), but were typically made of ceramic in many regions of China. During the Western Zhou dynasty (1050-771 BC) it became routine to cast these vessels in bronze and use them in various ceremonies and death rituals. The tiny interlaced snake-like creatures, which decorate many Eastern Zhou bronzes, are used on this example as background to a pattern of small protruding beads distributed symmetrically on the surface. The shape of the vessel, characterised by a hemispherical bowl on a high stem, was extensively reproduced during the Song dynasty (960-1279) when a taste for archaic objects was shared by the imperial court and wealthy élites.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
lidded-vessel-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
casting
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-475
year_start
-525