No Title

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Acquired in 2005 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Murose, Kazumi
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
date_end
2004-12-31
date_start
2004-01-01
date_text
2004 (made)
descriptive_line
Tiered food box, black lacquer on wood with striped maki-e ('sprinkled picture') decoration, by Murose Kazumi (1950-), 2004
dimensions
Height: 22.0 cm, Width: 21.3 cm, Depth: 21.3 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
194926
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T08:05:15.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T08:05:15.000Z
latitude
35.670479
location
In Storage
longitude
139.740921
marks
materials
materials_techniques
[]
museum_number
FE.318:1 to 5-2005
museum_number_token
fe3182005
object_number
O234016
object_type
Tiered box
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Tokyo
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Murose Kazumi (born 1950) is a leading figure in the world of contemporary Japanese lacquer. The son of a lacquer artist and a student at Tokyo University of Arts of the legendary Matsuda Gonroku (1896-1986), he is active both as an individual maker and as a conservator of historical lacquer artefacts. He first visited the V&A in the early 1990s when he was conducting a survey into the condition of lacquer collections in European museums. Since then he has given courses in lacquer cleaning at the V&A and has also taught staff from the Museum's Conservation Department at his studio in Tokyo. For two weeks in July 1995 he gave a series of demonstrations at the V&A on the techniques of maki-e ('sprinkled picture') decoration, the discipline in which he specialises. This was part of the education programme of the exhibition, 'Japanese Studio Crafts: Tradition and the Avant-Garde', held that summer. Having long sought to acquire an example of his work, the V&A was eventually able to purchase this supremely elegant tiered food box. With its striking decoration - the apparent simplicity of which belies the very exacting series of processes used in its making - this work represents an important new departure for Murose. 'Now that I have spent thirty years proving myself as a creator of pictorial designs,' he explained, 'I can now move on and embrace abstraction.'
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
slug
tiered-box-murose-kazumi
sys_updated
2014-01-28T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2004
year_start
2004