No Title

2006at3466 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1956 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Accrington Print Works
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
Given by Mrs J. Ferguson
date_end
1860-12-31
date_start
1840-01-01
date_text
1840-1860 (made)
descriptive_line
Furnishing fabric of roller-printed cotton, possibly made by Accrington Print Works, Lancashire, 1840-1860
dimensions
Height: 300 cm, Width: 72 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 125c
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in Accrington, Lancashire
id
19475
label
British Galleries: By 1840 Chinese styles had lost their appeal in the most fashionable circles but were still widely popular elsewhere. The leading Lancashire printers produced and exported large quantities of inexpensive cottons such as this one. Chinese figures and pavilions are shown in awkward combinations with flowers and exotic birds printed in bright colours on a striped ground. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T20:38:56.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T20:38:56.000Z
latitude
53.861172
location
British Galleries, room 125c, case 1
longitude
-2.55473
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Roller-printed cotton
museum_number
CIRC.175-1956
museum_number_token
circ1751956
object_number
O78024
object_type
Furnishing fabric
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Furnishing fabric of roller-printed cotton. With a chinoiserie design on a brown stripe, and flowers and birds on a white stripe.
place
Lancashire
primary_image_id
2006AT3466
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This is a printed cotton produced in Lancashire in the mid-19th century for export abroad. The cotton would have been intended for use as furnishing but would also have provided novelty use for a number of other purposes. The donor's grandfather worked in the Accrington Print Works and it is likely that the cotton was made in this factory. This is one of the so-called 'Portuguese prints' produced in large quantities by leading Lancashire printers between about 1840 and 1860. Although manufactured primarily for the Portuguese, Spanish and South American markets, enough examples have been found in the United States and in this country to prove that they were also used elsewhere. The distinguishing characteristics of cheap export cottons of this type are exotic flowers and animals, often incongruously combined with figures printed in bright colours on a striped ground. The use of Chinese figures as part of the overall pattern in this inexpensive export cotton shows that, despite Chinoiserie having limited appeal for high fashion in the mid-19th century, such details were still popular with the wider public.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
furnishing-fabric-accrington-print-works
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1860
year_start
1840