The Rivington Place Portfolio; The Prize

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2009 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Locke, Hew
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
PDP
credit
Purchased through the generous support of the Friends of the V&A
date_end
2007-12-31
date_start
2006-01-01
date_text
2006-2007 (printed and published)
descriptive_line
Rivington Place portfolio, 2006-7: Hew Locke
dimensions
Height: 76 cm, Width: 51 cm, Depth: 12.5 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
191178
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T07:51:34.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T07:51:34.000Z
latitude
40.14278
location
In Storage
longitude
-74.726723
marks
materials
plastic
materials_techniques
Digital prints with silkscreen, collaged into a 3D structure, with plastic beads and flowers
museum_number
E.163:7-2009
museum_number_token
e16372009
object_number
O230043
object_type
Print
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Digital prints with silkscreen, cut in 43 pieces and collaged into a 3D structure, with plastic beads and flowers.
place
New Jersey
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This print by Hew Locke (born Edinburgh, 1959) was made for The Rivington Place Portfolio (see E.163:1 to :9-2009). This mixed media collage print is representative of his characteristic practice in which he uses found or throwaway materials for sculptural constructions. This piece, which he titled The Prize is a complex and fragile work of cut and woven paper parts, involving photography, screen-printing, and digital and manual cutting and pasting, constructed like a 3-D jigsaw. The form is based on a chalice he saw in the V&A but transformed into something flimsy and flashy with plastic 'gold' beads, and plastic flowers, intended to allude to the hollowness of trophies and their devalued status in our society. It also alludes, obliquely, to ideas of looting, the forcible taking of 'trophies' which accompanied much of the enterprise of Imperialism and filled Britain's museums with treasures from other cultures. The words 'get well soon' are repeated in the pattern of the print with satiric intent; this sentiment is taken from mass-produced greetings cards, themselves as kitsch as the faux glitz of the baubles adorning the chalice, expresses the hope that the debilitating lust for power and wealth might itself be cured.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
slug
the-rivington-place-portfolio-the-print-locke-hew
sys_updated
2013-08-25T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
collage, digital inkjet printing
title
The Rivington Place Portfolio; The Prize
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2007
year_start
2006