The Rivington Place Portfolio; Stranger

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2009 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Ligon, Glenn
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
PDP
credit
Purchased through the generous support of the Friends of the V&A. Image: Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, © Glenn Ligon
date_end
2007-12-31
date_start
2006-01-01
date_text
2006-2007 (printed and published)
descriptive_line
Rivington Place portfolio, 2006-7: Glenn Ligon
dimensions
Height: 76 cm, Width: 51 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
191174
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T07:51:33.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T07:51:33.000Z
latitude
40.14278
location
In Storage
longitude
-74.726723
marks
G. Ligon Stranger 27/50 Glenn Ligon '07 BRODSKY CENTER 07-327
materials
paper
materials_techniques
Photogravure on paper
museum_number
E.163:6-2009
museum_number_token
e16362009
object_number
O230037
object_type
Print
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Photogravure on paper
place
New Jersey
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This print by Glenn Ligon (born New York, 1960) was made for The Rivington Place Portfolio (see E.163:1 to :9-2009). Ligon works with text or the 'ready-made' image which he then re-contextualises, often using humour, and endows with a new resonance. This print, a photogravure, is derived from a photograph in a textbook on conservation. The text - which he has taken unchanged from the book - reflects a passage in Ralph Ellison's 1951 novel Invisible Man, one of the major 20th-century works of literature addressing black lives and experience (and a key text for Ligon who has drawn on it repeatedly). In the book, the Invisible Man (who is black) reminisces about his work in a paint factory where only he knew the secret of mixing the perfect white paint by adding a secret quantity of black - clearly a metaphor for American society. The text Ligon has used for Stranger will immediately evoke this passage for those who know it, but its significance is obvious independent of that knowledge. The print also relates to a series of paintings, begun in 1996, in which he appropriates quotations from James Baldwin's essay 'Stranger in the Village' (1953) which details his experience of moving to a Swiss village where they had never before seen a black man.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
slug
the-rivington-place-portfolio-stranger-print-ligon-glenn
sys_updated
2014-06-23T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
photogravure
title
The Rivington Place Portfolio; Stranger
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2007
year_start
2006