No Title

2008bv1641 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1894 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Ray, Anthony. Spanish Pottery 1248-1898. London: V&A Publications, 2000, no.608, p312. Graves, Alun. Tiles and Tilework of Europe. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 2002, pp44-45.
collection_code
CER
credit
date_end
1400-12-31
date_start
1350-01-01
date_text
1350-1400 (made)
descriptive_line
Floor tile from the Alhambra Palace, Granada, painted in cobalt blue and lustre, made in Spain, Málaga or Granada, 1350-1400
dimensions
Width: 19.0 cm, Thickness: 2.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
World Ceramics, room 145
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
From the Alhambra, Granada. Apparently such tiles were widely used there, though only a small area now survives. The armorial shields represent an interesting use of a European device by the Nasrid Sultans. These bear the legend in Arabic, 'There is no conqueror but God', a motto adopted by Muhammed ben-el Ahmar ca. 1250.
id
180
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:18:39.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:18:39.000Z
latitude
36.71832
location
World Ceramics, room 145, case 3, shelf 2
longitude
-4.420159
marks
'There is no conqueror but God'
materials
earthenware, tin glaze
materials_techniques
Tin-glazed earthenware, painted in cobalt blue and lustre
museum_number
382-1894
museum_number_token
3821894
object_number
O128755
object_type
Floor tile
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Tin-glazed earthenware floor tile, painted with an interlace design around a central shield, containing the legend in Arabic, 'There is no conqueror but God'. The form of the tile is that of a square, the corners of which are replaced by a quarter-circular space, allowing for the laying of a smaller circular tile between each four large tiles.
place
Málaga
primary_image_id
2008BV1641
production_note
Ray (2000) suggests that it is likely that many of the Alhambra tiles were produced in Málaga, but that others could have been made in Granada itself, at kilns set up for that express purpose.
production_type
public_access_description
This tile came from the Alhambra, the fortified palatine city of the Nasrid kingdom, built on a hill overlooking Granada in the south of Spain. Such tiles were used to decorate palace floors, though today few remain in place. The armorial shields at their centre represent an interesting use of a European device by the Nasrid Sultans.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
floor-tile-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-25T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1400
year_start
1350