Relief

2006bh6432 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1999 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Guy, John (ed.). 'L'Escultura en els Temples Indis: L'Art de la Devocio', Barcelona : Fundacio 'La Caixa', 2007. ISBN 9788476649466. p. 52, cat.8
collection_code
SSEA
credit
date_end
0200-12-31
date_start
0001-01-01
date_text
1st century-2nd century (made)
descriptive_line
Relief with an erotic scene, terracotta, Uttar Pradesh, north India, 1st-2nd century
dimensions
Height: 7.5 cm, Depth: 1 cm, Width: 8.5 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
: L’escultura en els temples indis: l’art de la devocio (CaixaForum, Barcelona 27/07/2007-18/11/2007)
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
17903
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T20:30:02.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T20:30:02.000Z
latitude
27.138439
location
In Storage
longitude
80.86235
marks
materials
terracotta
materials_techniques
Terracotta
museum_number
IS.145-1999
museum_number_token
is1451999
object_number
O13736
object_type
Relief
on_display
original_currency
Australian Dollars ($A)
original_price
700.00
physical_description
Relief with an erotic scene
place
Uttar Pradesh
primary_image_id
2006BH6432
production_note
Uttar Pradesh, north India
production_type
Unique
public_access_description
A small modelled terracotta panel depicting a couple engaged in energetic love-making. The woman reclines on a bed, holding her spread legs whilst the man stands as he enters her. Both figures are youthful and athletic and wear their hair tied in off-set buns, characteristic of Sunga-period fashion; both also wear large ear-plug ornaments, again a recognised accoutrement of the period. The scene is set in a interior space, with Sunga-period crenelations visible on the upper wall, reminiscent of details seen on the railing coping stones of the Buddhist stupa site of Bharhut. Erotic clay reliefs are a important category of early Indian terracottas and may be assumed to have been intended to give expression to early notions of fertility cults. The woman's posture, with exposed genitalia, persisted as the cult image of the goddess cult in the early medieval period, where the icon was often represented as only the female genitalia and the body replaced by a flower-head. Early erotic terracottas of this type probably represent the genesis of the Lajja Gauri cult image.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
relief-relief-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Relief
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
200
year_start
1