Moulded Image

2010de8462 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1999 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Guy, John: 'Indian Temple Sculpture', London V&A Publication, 2007, p.40, pl.40. ISBN 9781851775095 Guy, John (ed.). ‘L’Escultura en els Temples Indis: L’Art de la Devocio’, Barcelona : Fundacio ‘La Caixa’, 2007. ISBN 9788476649466. p.57, cat. 17.
collection_code
SSEA
credit
date_end
0100-12-31
date_start
date_text
1st century BC to 1st Century AD (made)
descriptive_line
Seated yaksa, terracotta, Bengal, eastern India, 1st century BC-1st century AD
dimensions
Height: 12.8 cm, Depth: 5.5 cm, Width: 6 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
: L’escultura en els temples indis: l’art de la devocio (CaixaForum, Barcelona 27/07/2007-18/11/2007)
gallery
Ceramics Study Galleries, Asia & Europe, room 137
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
17849
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T20:29:47.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T20:29:47.000Z
latitude
21.7866
location
Ceramics Study Galleries, Asia & Europe, room 137, case R, shelf 3
longitude
82.794762
marks
materials
Clay
materials_techniques
[]
museum_number
IS.133-1999
museum_number_token
is1331999
object_number
O13423
object_type
Terracotta
on_display
1
original_currency
Australian Dollars ($A)
original_price
1000.00
physical_description
Seated yaksa. The function of such small icons is unclear, although they may have served as devotional tools for appeasing the spirits of the natural world.
place
India
primary_image_id
2010DE8462
production_note
Chandraketugarh, Bengal, eastern India.
production_type
Unique
public_access_description
The cults devoted to nature spirit worship in early India generated the earliest corpus of sculptural evidence from the subcontinent, and prepared the way for image making for the religions which followed and displaced the yaksa and yaksi cults. Monumental stone sculptures survive from northern India, along with an array of small clay and terracotta images that were produced across the length of the Gangetic plains. The style and clay-body here suggests that this moulded image of a seated yaksa is from Bengal, where many examples of these cult figures have been found. This example is similar to finds from Chandraketugarh and other coastal sites in Bengal, but its precise provenance is unrecorded. The figure is represented as a grotesque with a hunchback physique and corpulent body. He is garlanded and wears an ornamental woven headband crowned with a curious hair construction (jatamukuta); he is seated on a cane stool. The figure has been moulded in a two-part mould, the sections being luted together with a clay slip, the vertical seam remaining visible. Such images were produced in large quantities for placing at yaksa shrines, which may have ranged from a simple stone slab serving as a platform-altar beneath a tree or at a tank or riverside, to constructed yaksa shrines of which a number are recorded in inscriptions from the Kushan period. The precise religious or magical function of such figurines is unknown but we may assume they were essentially protective and talsimanic, to ward off the malevolent forces that were understood to roam the Indian countryside.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
moulded-image-terracotta-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Moulded Image
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
100
year_start
-100