No Title

2006bf5821 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1988 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
Doris Marchetti Gift
date_end
date_start
date_text
1150 BC-1050 BC (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 32 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
China, room 44
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
17819
label
Goblet (gu) Shang dynasty 1150-1050 BC All ancient bronze vessels had a specific name. This goblet for wine is called a gu. Cast bronze Mrs D. Marchetti Gift Museum no. FE.156-1988 [2007]
last_checked
2014-08-29T20:29:36.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T20:29:36.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
China, room 44, case 9
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
bronze
materials_techniques
Cast bronze
museum_number
FE.156-1988
museum_number_token
fe1561988
object_number
O12712
object_type
Goblet
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Tall and slender bronze goblet (gu) with two bands of taotie motifs (zoomorphic masks) round the foot and at the base of the stem, and four vertical rising blades with stylised taotie and leiwen (Greek fret) patterns up to the neck.The horizontal taotie bands are separated by four straight, notched flanges. The bronze has an even grey-green patina overlaid with more brilliant green patches due to corrosion.
place
China
primary_image_id
2006BF5821
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This vessel, called a gu in Chinese, is an exquisite example of bronze craftsmanship. It was made at the end of the Shang dynasty, about 1150-1050 BC, probably in the capital Anyang. It was probably used as a communal drinking goblet or libation cup during the traditional rites for the ancestors celebrated by members of the royal family. The ownership and use of this and other ritual vessels were essential components of the ruling system under the Shang kings, and contributed to their power and authority. Bronze vessels like this were kept in temples for ceremonies or buried in graves to denote status and prestige. The cost, craftsmanship and labor required to produce these items further emphasises their value. The artisans had to first make outer moulds composed of several sections around a prototype of the finished bronze and then reproduce the patterns in reverse on the surface of the sections. They would then assemble the moulds around a core leaving a space between the outer and inner parts into which melted bronze would be poured. Once the bronze had solidified, the outer moulds and the inner core were removed.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
goblet-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
casting
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-1050
year_start
-1150