No Title

2006bf5258 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1935 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
Purchased with the assistance of The Art Fund, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee
date_end
date_start
date_text
1400 BC-1200 BC (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 26 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
Chinese art (Burlington Fine Arts Club 01/01/1915-31/12/1915)
gallery
China, room 44
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
17817
label
Food vessel (li) Shang dynasty 1450-1250 BC All ancient bronze vessels had a specific name. This one, with three hollow legs, is called a li. Cast bronze Museum no. M.3-1935 [2007]
last_checked
2014-08-29T20:29:36.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T20:29:36.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
China, room 44, case 9
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
bronze
materials_techniques
Cast bronze
museum_number
M.3-1935
museum_number_token
m31935
object_number
O12693
object_type
Vessel
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Bronze vessel (li) with three-lobed body, everted rim and two vertical loop handles, standing on three partially hollowed legs. The surface is decorated with spiral shapes and pairs of protruding eyes separated by vertical raised flanges.
place
China
primary_image_id
2006BF5258
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The distinctive three-lobed shape of this bronze vessel, in Chinese called a li, derives from a ceramic type produced since the Neolithic period (ca. 5000-1700 BC). In the Bronze Age the li had handles along the rim and was used as a ritual vessel. The surface of this example is decorated with a simple design of spiral shapes and pairs of protruding eyes, separated by raised vertical flanges. The simplicity of the pattern suggests that the vessel was made relatively early in the Bronze Age, around the 14th-13th century BC, and possibly in the Shaanxi region, away from the metropolitan centres. Bronze vessels were considered an important symbol of status during the Shang dynasty (about 1600-1050 BC) and were buried in the graves of their owners. The cost, craftsmanship and labor required to produce these items further emphasises their value. The artisans had to first make outer moulds composed of several sections around a prototype of the finished bronze and then reproduce the patterns in reverse on the surface of the sections. They would then assemble the moulds around a core leaving a space between the outer and inner parts into which melted bronze would be poured. Once the bronze had solidified, the outer moulds and the inner core were removed.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
vessel-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
casting
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-1200
year_start
-1400