The Annunciation; Cacus Stealing the Oxen from Hercules

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Acquired in 1959 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
SCP
credit
date_end
0200-12-31
date_start
0100-01-01
date_text
2nd century (made) late 15th century (made)
descriptive_line
Intaglio, bloodstone, The Annunciation and Cacus Stealing the Oxen from Hercules, obverse: Roman (2nd or 3rd century), reverse: Florence (late 15th century)
dimensions
Width: 33 mm approximate, Height: 28 mm approximate
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Bequeathed by Miss M.F.T. Ready.
id
159385
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T06:07:23.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T06:07:23.000Z
latitude
41.903111
location
In Storage
longitude
12.49576
marks
'AVE MARIA GRA'
materials
bloodstone
materials_techniques
Bloodstone
museum_number
A.4-1959
museum_number_token
a41959
object_number
O195844
object_type
Intaglio
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Bloodstone cameo with two different sides. Obverse: a naked figure of a man approaches from the right towards an ox, which is standing behind a reclining naked figure of a man. The latter lies asleep on a ledge of rock. Behind the ox a cluster of trees. Reverse: between columns and beneath a double arch, the Archangel Gabriel appears to the Virgin who is kneeling before a prie-dieu. The Virgin turns her head to speak to the Angel. A lily in a vase stands in the centre of the scene; on the left, above the prie-dieu, a dove in a halo. On the entablature an inscription.
place
Rome
primary_image_id
production_note
2nd or 3rd century (obverse); late 15th century (reverse)
production_type
public_access_description
The art of engraving gemstones has been admired since the early days of the Roman empire. It was revived in Europe during the Renaissance, and again in the 18th and 19th centuries. Cameos and intaglios were prized and collected, sometimes as symbols of power and mounted in jewelled settings, sometimes as small objects for private devotion or enjoyment An intaglio carving is cut into the surface of the material and a cameo is in relief. The art of gemstone carving was known in ancient Greece and Rome and revived in Renaissance Italy, when connoisseurs began to form rich collections of engraved stones.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
the-annunciation-cacus-stealing-the-intaglio-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
The Annunciation; Cacus Stealing the Oxen from Hercules
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
200
year_start
100