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Acquired in 2009 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Auerbach, Frank
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
PDP
credit
Given by Frank Auerbach, with Marc Balakjian and Dorothea Wight of Studio Prints
date_end
2006-12-31
date_start
2006-01-01
date_text
2006 (made)
descriptive_line
Etching plate, copper, Frank Auerbach, 2006
dimensions
Height: 40.7 cm, Width: 30 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
154320
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T05:49:20.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T05:49:20.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F, case TEMP, shelf 2
longitude
-0.12714
marks
materials
copper
materials_techniques
Etched copper plate
museum_number
E.15-2009
museum_number_token
e152009
object_number
O190228
object_type
Etching plate
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Etching plate with portrait of a man's head, cancelled by three punch marks lower left.
place
London
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Frank Auerbach is one of the most renowned artists of the later 20th century. He has made prints throughout his career, many of them, such as this, a study of one of the same few subjects whose portraits he paints repeatedly. 'Jake' is Jake Tilson, himself an artist and printmaker. This plate is one of several plates (by various artists) which have been donated to the V&A through the good offices of the printer Marc Balakjian and his partner at Studio Prints, Dorothea Wight. Marc Balakjian has provided valuable insights into Auerbach's working methods. In this case he explained that rather than using a conventional etching needle, Auerbach preferred to use a screwdriver, using its flat edge for the broad lines, and turning it sideways to get a point to make the finer lines. Auerbach's use of line in his printmaking is very distinctive. At one point a mistake has been 'erased' by hammering the plate from the back to lift the surface. The artist has cancelled the plate unobtrusively by adding three small punched marks lower left, rather than by scoring through the image.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
VA
slug
etching-plate-auerbach-frank
sys_updated
2013-08-25T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
etching
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2006
year_start
2006