Head of Gazelle

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1907 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum in the Years 1905 - 1908. In: List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum, During the Year 1907, Arranged According to the Dates of Acquisition with Appendix and Indices. London: Printed for His Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Limited, 1909, p. 129 Longhurst, Margaret H. Catalogue of Carvings in Ivory. Part I. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1927, pp. 15, 16
collection_code
SCP
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
3238 BC-2990 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Part of a wand / figure, head of a Gazelle, ivory, Egypt, 1st dynasty (3238-2990)
dimensions
Height: 7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
It's part of a wand probably used by dancers to keep time.
historical_significance
history_note
Found in a tomb at Gizeh, the Mastaba V, grave 23, during the excavations of 1906-07. It was given by the British School of Archeology in Egypt.
id
150633
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T05:36:43.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T05:36:43.000Z
latitude
26.69636
location
In Storage
longitude
30.246469
marks
materials
ivory
materials_techniques
Ivory
museum_number
746FRAG/1, 2-1907
museum_number_token
7461907
object_number
O186260
object_type
Part of wand
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Upper part of an ivory wand terminating in the head of a gazelle. The front is convex, the back is flat.
place
Egypt
primary_image_id
production_note
1st Dynasty
production_type
public_access_description
This ivory is part of a wand probably used by dancers to keep time. It was found at Giza, in the grave 23, of Mastaba V and it is from the 1st Dynasty, which was 3238-2990 BC. A mastaba was an earlier tomb development, before the Pyramids were built. It was the standard tomb for Pharaohs and the social elite. But also later when the Pyramids were built, they remained built as simpler versions for the tombs. The word mastaba comes from Arabic and means bench. The mastaba's shape was rectangular with a flat roof and it had sloping sides. Below the whole over ground structure, was the underground chamber, for the remains of the deceased. The over ground building also contained a chapel, used by priests and family to bring their offerings.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
head-of-gazelle-part-of-wand-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Head of Gazelle
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-2990
year_start
-3238