No Title

2006ay0709 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1925 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Novissimo, Pasquale
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
Given by the artist's daughter, Linda Novissimo
date_end
1884-12-31
date_start
1875-01-01
date_text
ca. 1880 (made)
descriptive_line
Brooch, gold openwork with filigree decoration, designed by Pasquale Novissimo, England (London), about 1880
dimensions
Height: 4.1 cm, Width: 4.6 cm, Depth: 1.6 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
1500
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:25:21.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:25:21.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 21, shelf A, box 10
longitude
-0.12714
marks
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold openwork with filigree decoration
museum_number
M.62-1925
museum_number_token
m621925
object_number
O115905
object_type
Brooch
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Brooch, gold openwork with filigree decoration.
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AY0709
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The brooch was given to the Museum in 1925 by the daughter of the artist Pasquale Novissimo who died in 1914. Although this brooch is in the antique taste, Novissimo largely supplied the jeweller Carlo Giuliano with Renaissance rather than classical designs for jewellery. The granulation, or fine surface texture of minute grains of gold on this brooch, was copied from the Etruscan technique. Although the precise method was not mastered by 19th century goldsmiths a similar effect was achieved. The archaeological discoveries of the 19th century led to a greater understanding of ancient jewellery. For the first time, experts could collect, study and publish works on these intricate gold pieces. Intellectuals particularly admired archaeological-style jewellery, often closely copied from surviving finds, from around 1860 until at least the 1880s. Carlo Giuliano, a Neapolitan by birth, worked for the great Castellani firm in Italy before moving to London in about 1860. His early work in London closely resembles Castellani's productions in the classical manner. He later evolved a distinctive style of his own, using stones and enamel to create rich polychromatic effects. Carlo Giuliano's first mark, 'CG' in monogram, was based on the monogram of the Castellani firm. His early work in London closely resembles the Castellani pieces in the classical style.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
brooch-novissimo-pasquale
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
filigree, granulation
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1884
year_start
1875