No Title

2009cc4781 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1876 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Yolande Crowe, Persia and China: Safavid Blue and White Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum, 1501-1738, London (Thames & Hudson), 2002: cat. no. 29, p. 64.
collection_code
MES
credit
date_end
1640-12-31
date_start
1595-01-01
date_text
ca. 1600- 1640 (made)
descriptive_line
Dish, fritware, painted in underglaze cobalt blue with s scholar in a landscape, Iran, 1600-1640.
dimensions
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
World Ceramics, room 145
historical_context_note
Persian blue and white ceramics were primarily produced during the rule of the Safavid Dynasty in Iran (early 16th century to early 18th century). Iranian potters were almost exclusively preoccupied with making wares in the styles of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain some close copies and some more fanciful. Echoes of earlier traditions remained, in particular in the black-under-turquoise colour scheme that dates back in Iran to the end of the 12th century. Towards the end of the 16th century there was a widening of interest that blossomed in the 17th century to a wide range of styles and techniques in which blue and white plays a dominant but not exclusive role.
historical_significance
history_note
Historical significance: From the last quarter of the 16th until mid 17th century Chinese dishes with petal panels were the common export wares. The striking effect of the new style of decoration made the design popular not only with the Persian potter but also across western Europe. The design originated in the Tang dynasty when the flattened petals of the lotus decorated Buddhist paintings, stone tiles and various artefacts. These panels vary in number but they are usually six or eight according to the size of the dish. Flowers, fruit, birds and sacred emblems are adopted as decorations and the simplified leafy peach motif becomes especially popular in both China and Persia. In the 17th century Persian potters reinterpret the human figures copied from Chinese models in a comic manner.
id
141148
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T05:01:56.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T05:01:56.000Z
latitude
32.42065
location
World Ceramics, room 145, case 5, shelf 2
longitude
53.682362
marks
materials
fritware
materials_techniques
Fritware, painted and glazed
museum_number
1088-1876
museum_number_token
10881876
object_number
O176038
object_type
Dish
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Large dish, fritware, painted with an imitation-Chinese composition including a seated figure in underglaze cobalt blue.
place
Iran
primary_image_id
2009CC4781
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
By the 1620s, Iranian potters were producing convincing copies of the Chinese porcelain imports flooding into Iran since the 1580s. The challenge was to produce well-painted Kraak-style designs on thinly walled vessels.The panelled border around the rim is almost a direct copy of a Kraak-style dish. However, the seated scholar in the centre of the dish, while utlimately based on a Chinese figure type, has been adapted as a poet with a flask of wine, a popular subject found in Iranian painting in the Safavid period.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
dish-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-16T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
glazing, Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1640
year_start
1595