Beijing, The Cupboard

2008bu4216 jpg l

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Acquired in 2007 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Marrigje de Maar
attributions_note
bibliography
'Hollands Licht in China' exhibition catalogue, 2008, p. 5.
collection_code
PDP
credit
Purchased through the generosity of Nicholas Stanley
date_end
2005-12-31
date_start
2005-01-01
date_text
2005 (made) 2006 (printed)
descriptive_line
Colour photograph of a domestic interior, taken outside of Beijing.
dimensions
Height: 115 cm frame, Length: 124 cm frame
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
2008 Photography Gallery re-hang (Victoria & Albert Museum 01/04/2008-30/04/2009)
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
137063
label
De Maar's series Home Made is concerned with domestic spaces in various countries. Personal belongings, and the evidence of daily habits and necessities, give shape to a room and its inhabitants. Her images are made predominantly in the early morning, with natural light, so they require long exposures. This example shows one of the many unfinished houses on the outskirts of the rapidly expanding city of Beijing.
last_checked
2014-08-30T04:48:07.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T04:48:07.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
In Storage
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Lambda print
museum_number
E.3691-2007
museum_number_token
e36912007
object_number
O171277
object_type
Photograph
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Colour photograph of a domestic interior, taken outside of Beijing.
place
China
primary_image_id
2008BU4216
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Marrigje de Maar's series, 'Home Made' (2003-2006), of which this photograph is a part, is about private, domestic spaces in various countries, including the Netherlands, Finland, Russia, China and Japan. De Maar rarely photographs the inhabitants of these spaces but the rooms nevertheless are seen by the artist as portraits of those who live in them. Personal belongings, and the evidence of habits and daily necessities, give shape to the character of the room and the person. In most cases, De Maar gains admittance by going unannounced from door to door and showing a letter of introduction in the appropriate language. With this method, she is able to catch authentic states of domestic interiors and not one that is a censured or a version presented for visitors. Her images are made predominantly with available natural light and require long exposures. They share a sensibility with historic Dutch 'Golden Age' paintings of domestic interiors, but combine this with distinctly modern subjects and concerns. Across cultural boundaries, desire for personal space seems to be universal. By dealing with the notion of home de Maar's images touch a common personal interest to which all viewers can relate. The photographs not only open the door to the private lives of others but also offer a possibility for reflecting on our own.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
beijing-the-cupboard-photograph-marrigje-de-maar
sys_updated
2013-08-25T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Beijing, The Cupboard
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2005
year_start
2005