No Title

2010ej2053 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1926 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Kerr, Rose (ed.). Chinese Art and Design. The T.T.Tsui Gallery of Chinese Art. London: Victoria and Albert Museum. 1991, p. 224, fig. 105 Wilson, Ming. Archaic Chinese bronzes, manuscript. London. 1992, p. 60-61
collection_code
EAS
credit
Brooks Bequest
date_end
date_start
date_text
ca. 1050 BC-950 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Ritual bronze vessel gui, China, Western Zhou dynasty, 1050-771 BC
dimensions
[Food vessel (gui)] Height: 15 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
China, room 44
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
134586
label
Bronze vessel 1050-950 BC, Zhou dynasty The name of this vessel gui is based on inscriptions found on the vessels themselves. It was a ritual vessel for holding cereals. [June 1991]
last_checked
2014-08-30T04:38:33.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T04:38:33.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
China, room 44, case 33
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
bronze
materials_techniques
[Food vessel (gui)] Cast bronze
museum_number
M.1162-1926
museum_number_token
m11621926
object_number
O168504
object_type
Vessel and stand
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
[Food vessel (gui)] Bronze ritual vessel gui, decorated with a taotie mask on the front and back of the body and stylised confronting leiwen dragons on the foot; the two handles terminate with an animal head
place
China
primary_image_id
2010EJ2053
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This type of bronze vessel, called gui in Chinese, was originally used in the 11th-10th century as a food container during the ritual ceremonies for the ancestors. Vessels of this type were also buried in high-ranking tombs as part of a complete ritual set; the number and type of bronze objects would vary according to the status of the deceased. By the late 16th century, archaic bronze vessels had become prestigious items to be collected and displayed in exclusive circles of literati and members of the upper classes, who were keen to show their wealth and refined taste. From Ming paintings we know that gui vessels could be used as incense burners.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
vessel-and-stand-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-08T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-950
year_start
-1055