Black and White Pair

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2007 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Jordan, John
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
FWK
credit
Given by the American Friends of the V&A through the generosity of Martha Connell and the Connell Gallery
date_end
2002-12-31
date_start
2002-01-01
date_text
2002 (turning)
descriptive_line
Turned vessel, bleached off-white elder; made by John Jordan, Tennessee, 2002
dimensions
Height: 170 mm, Diameter: 230 mm maximum
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
National Art Library, room 76
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
120673
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T03:41:10.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T03:41:10.000Z
latitude
35.83062
location
National Art Library, room 76, case 15
longitude
-85.978554
marks
John Jordan 2002
materials
box elder
materials_techniques
Turned and carved bleached box elder
museum_number
LOAN:AMERICANFRIENDS.518-2007
museum_number_token
loanamericanfriends5182007
object_number
O152658
object_type
Vessel
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Turned wooden vessel, slightly flattened spherical form with narrow open neck, bleached off-white elder with alternating textured and smooth panels.
place
Tennessee
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
Unique
public_access_description
John Jordan was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1950. Like many wood artists he worked in a different profession, as a computer service engineer in banking, before focusing his attentions on wood-turning full-time from 1987. Self-taught, Jordan is best known for his simple yet finely detailed vessels and for the fact that he often uses wood found on construction sites or dumps. The emotion and feeling for natural materials, especially wood, and for the forms that he creates are central to Jordan’s aesthetic. He has described himself as ‘being connected to the material of wood as a potter is connected to clay – it’s what I do and who I am.’ Using fresh-cut or 'green' wood, which is easier to turn and carve, Jordan seeks to emphasise contrasts within a single form and its material. Here he juxtaposes the simple shape of the vessel with the intricate detail of its surface carving, an effect that can take weeks to achieve. The four panels, which are framed by sharply incised borders, are left uncarved and polished to a high sheen which shows off the grain of the wood. The rest of the vessel however, is finely and uniformly tooled to create an almost shimmering textured effect. There are also contrasts in the form itself: the small open neck and flat base emphasise the full roundness of the vessel with the concave tops and convex sides of the panel borders adding further to this effect. This vessel is one of two called ‘Black and White Pair’ and so its bleached off-white colour provides yet another contrast, this time against the blackened colour of its pair.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
VA
slug
black-and-white-pair-vessel-jordan-john
sys_updated
2013-03-13T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
carving, turning, bleaching
title
Black and White Pair
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2002
year_start
2002