No Title

2006af7396 jpg l

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Acquired in 1930 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MES
credit
date_end
1000-12-31
date_start
0900-01-01
date_text
10th century (made)
descriptive_line
Whiteware bowl with a deer painted in lustre, Iraq (probably Basra), 10th century.
dimensions
Diameter: 9.5 cm, Height: 3.2 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Islamic Middle East, room 42
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
10319
label
BOWL White-glazed earthenware painted in blue and lustre. MESOPOTAMIAN; 9th or 10th century. [Old gallery label] Whiteware Bowls with Lustre Iraq, probably Basra 900-1000 The two bowls represent a later phase in Iraqi lustre production. Only one metallic pigment was used, but it has a more reflective surface. The decoration was inspired by the silverware of the period, which was sometimes decorated with humans and animals. Even the dotted backgrounds reproduce silver texturing. Earthenware with lustre painted over and (8) cobalt into the opaque glaze Museum nos. C.350-1930; C.62-1981 [Jameel Gallery]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:54:51.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:54:51.000Z
latitude
30.485809
location
Islamic Middle East, room 42, case 2W
longitude
47.807911
marks
materials
earthenware, Clay, Lustre, opaque white glaze
materials_techniques
Earthenware with an opaque white glaze; in-glaze painting in blue and decoration in lustre
museum_number
C.350-1930
museum_number_token
c3501930
object_number
O7360
object_type
Bowl
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Small bowl with a deer depicted in lustre on contour panels against a dotted ground; a word in blue written radially.
place
Basra
primary_image_id
2006AF7396
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This bowl represents an early development in Iraqi lustre ceramics. In the initial phase of lustre production, potters used two metallic pigments. Here the potter has used only one, but now it has a more reflective surface. The decoration was inspired by the silverware of the period, which was sometimes decorated with humans and animals. Even the dotted background reproduces the texture of silver. Potters in Iraq invented the technique of lustre decoration on ceramics in the 9th century. First they made a glazed vessel or tile with little or no decoration in the normal way. When the piece had cooled, a design was painted over the glaze in metallic compounds. The pot or tile was then fired again, this time with a restricted supply of oxygen. In these conditions, the metallic compounds broke down, and a thin deposit of copper or silver was left on the surface of the glaze. When polished, this surface layer reflected the light.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
bowl-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
glazing
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1000
year_start
900