No Title

2006am6895 jpg l

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Acquired in 1885 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Derby Porcelain factory
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Given by Lady Charlotte Schreiber
date_end
1775-12-31
date_start
1774-01-01
date_text
1774-1775 (made)
descriptive_line
Vase of soft-paste porcelain, painted with enamels and gilded, and with two scrolled loop handles, a short expanding fluted neck, and truncated oviform body with an urn-shaped foot resting on a square plinth, made by Derby Porcelain factory, Derby, 1774-1775.
dimensions
Height: 22.9 cm, Diameter: 9.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118d
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
One of a pair with 414:436-1885 (Sch. I 368).
id
10233
label
British Galleries: Vasemania
Vases were a very important element of the Neo-classical style. The pottery manufacturer Josiah Wedgwood, who could hardly make them fast enough, spoke of 'vasemania'. They appeared as three-dimensional objects and as decorative motifs. Vase forms also influenced the shape of practical items of all sorts, from tea canisters to candlesticks. Designers plundered sources far and wide for new designs, from Greek pottery to 16th- and 17th-century prints. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:54:31.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:54:31.000Z
latitude
52.925171
location
British Galleries, room 118d, case 2
longitude
-1.48368
marks
'20' [Incised]
materials
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels, moulded and gilded
museum_number
414:436/A-1885
museum_number_token
414436a1885
object_number
O79626
object_type
Vase
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Vase of soft-paste porcelain, painted with enamels and gilded, and with a short expanding fluted neck, truncated oviform body with an urn-shaped foot resting on a square plinth, two scrolled loop handles rising above the rim, and the upper part of the foot is gadrooned, and the body is decorated with moulded vertical bands, alternately white and turquoise-blue with gilt lines, and enclosed by blue bands, which are concave, are garlands of laurel hanging from the shoulder.
place
Derby
primary_image_id
2006AM6895
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type This vase is one of a pair (414:436-1885). They were probably purely ornamental, and intended to be displayed on a mantelpiece or wall-bracket in a domestic interior. 'Antique' vases like this were also displayed in glazed china cabinets and set out on ladies' dressing tables. A Derby auction catalogue of 1773 states that 'Antique ... Urns, Vases, Jars, &c' were 'particularly adapted for the Decoration of Chimney Pieces, Cabinets, Toilets. &c.' Trading Vases of this kind are probably similar to the 'Octagon inverted vases' listed in a trade catalogue issued by the Derby porcelain factory. This was probably published in about 1774, when the Derby management opened showrooms in Covent Garden, London. Time William Duesbury (1725-1786), the manager and part-owner of the Derby factory, seems to have reorganized design and production at the factory around 1770. In that year he aquired the prestigious Chelsea porcelain factory, and took on new modellers. Spurred on by the example of the Staffordshire potter Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795), he began manufacturing ornamental wares and figures in the new 'antique' or Neo-classical style, entering into competition with Wedgwood in the production of 'antique' vases such as these.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
vase-derby-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1775
year_start
1774