No Title

2006am2776 jpg l

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Acquired in 1885 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Derby Porcelain factory
attributions_note
bibliography
Clifford, Timothy. Some English Ceramic Vases and their Sources, Part 1. English Ceramic Circle Transactions. Vol. 10, part 3. Pl. 83A&C
collection_code
CER
credit
Given by Lady Charlotte Schreiber
date_end
1774-12-31
date_start
1770-01-01
date_text
1770-1774 (made)
descriptive_line
Vase and cover of soft-paste porcelain, painted with enamels, gilded and moulded, made by Derby Porcelain factory, Derby, ca. 1770-1774.
dimensions
Height: 27.3 cm, Diameter: 12.1 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
The Genuis of Wedgwood (Victoria & Albert Museum 01/01/1995-31/12/2006)
gallery
British Galleries, room 118d
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
One of a pair with 414:239/1, 2-1885 (Sch. I 372&A).
id
10226
label
British Galleries: Vasemania
Vases were a very important element of the Neo-classical style. The pottery manufacturer Josiah Wedgwood, who could hardly make them fast enough, spoke of 'vasemania'. They appeared as three-dimensional objects and as decorative motifs. Vase forms also influenced the shape of practical items of all sorts, from tea canisters to candlesticks. Designers plundered sources far and wide for new designs, from Greek pottery to 16th- and 17th-century prints. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:54:29.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:54:29.000Z
latitude
52.925171
location
British Galleries, room 118d, case 2
longitude
-1.48368
marks
materials
soft-paste porcelain
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels, gilded and moulded
museum_number
414:239/3, 4-1885
museum_number_token
4141885
object_number
O79616
object_type
Vase and cover
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Vase and cover of soft-paste porcelain, painted with enamels, gilded and moulded. [Vase] Vase with an oviform body and short concave neck with claret-coloured ground, and it is supported by three white caryatid figures ending downwards in lions' paws, which rest on a moulded circular pedestal painted with trophies of arms en grisaille, and wreaths of flowers, painted, are festooned round the body and across the figures. [Cover] High domed cover decorated with gilt pierced rococo scrolls and surmounted by a bouquet of flowers.
place
Derby
primary_image_id
2006AM2776
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Perfume vases (also known as 'essence pots' and pot-pourri vases) were set out on chimneypieces. They were filled with pot-pourri (perfumed or sweet-smelling leaves) similar to those used to sweeten the air in domestic interiors today. Perfume vases of this design were made in pairs, but also sold singly. Design & Designing The market for vases in the 'antique' style grew rapidly in the late 1760s, as the Neo-classical style gained ground. The demand was so great that, in addition to copying genuine Greek and Roman antiquities, manufacturers took designs from prints of the 17th and 18th centuries. Some of these prints were highly fanciful inventions, which may not have been seriously intended for production. The design here is taken from a print in Joseph-Marie Vien's Suite de Vases of 1760. The shape was made at Chelsea prior to its takeover by the Derby porcelain factory in 1770. Vien's engraved design was also copied in Black Basalt by the Staffordshire potter Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795). Trading Chelsea porcelain vases of this shape were sold at a London auction held in 1770. They were described as 'antique urns upon pedestals ... ornamented with womens heads, and garlands of flowers'. They realized £6 5s for a pair and £3 12s for a single one. At that time, Chelsea and Derby modellers earned around £2 11s. per week.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
vase-and-cover-derby-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
moulded, Painted, gilded
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1774
year_start
1770