No Title

2006am7042 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1885 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Bow Porcelain Factory
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Given by Lady Charlotte Schreiber
date_end
1769-12-31
date_start
1760-01-01
date_text
ca. 1765 (made)
descriptive_line
Teapot and lid of soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels of bouquets and sprays of flowers, made by Bow Porcelain Factory, London, ca. 1765.
dimensions
Height: 8.6 cm, Diameter: 7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 52b
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Part of a toy tea service 414:123 to /L-1885 (Sch. I 81 to L).
id
10197
label
British Galleries: Although his miniature tea service was probably designed for a child, it was more common for adults to buy such novelties or 'toys' for themselves. Today, children's tea sets are smaller in size and more suited for dolls' houses. The size of this tea cup, however, suggests it was actually used for serving tea. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:54:20.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:54:20.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 52b, case 2
longitude
-0.12714
marks
materials
soft-paste porcelain
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels
museum_number
414:123/&A-1885
museum_number_token
4141885
object_number
O79575
object_type
Teapot and lid
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Teapot and lid of soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels of bouquets and sprays of flowers. [Teapot] Teapot with a globular body, slightly curved spout, and loop handle. [Cover] Lid is domed with a round knob.
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AM7042
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Although small and intended for a child, the service that includes this teapot was probably intended for actual use, as the cups are large enough. Like many ceramic tea services, this one includes both tea bowls and handled cups of a type usually thought to have been for coffee. Tea cups with handles were being made in England at the time that this service was made, but handle-less bowls of the Chinese type were more common. The service includes a small jug for milk or cream - often added to tea after about 1720, when fermented black teas became more popular than the unfermented green varieties - and a covered bowl for refined white sugar. Materials & Making The Bow porcelain factory, where the service was made, produced a type of porcelain strengthened with ashes from animal bones. The result was a comparatively durable ceramic material, one that would have been suitable for making wares for children. Trading Bow porcelain was sold from a warehouse on the factory site, from London showrooms, and it could be purchased at auction or from dealers in smaller cities. Much was also sold to merchants for export to the American colonies and elsewhere.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
teapot-and-lid-bow-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1769
year_start
1760