No Title

2006am3647 jpg l

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Acquired in 1969 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Gunta Stölzl
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
date_end
1931-12-31
date_start
1929-01-01
date_text
1929-1931 (made) 1929-1931 (made)
descriptive_line
Hand-woven textile sample, designed by Gunta Stölzl, Dessau Bauhaus, Germany, 1929-1931
dimensions
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Twentieth Century, room 74
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
101635
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T02:26:17.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T02:26:17.000Z
latitude
52.454962
location
Twentieth Century, room 74, case CA8, box 12
longitude
6.916465
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Hand-woven
museum_number
CIRC.421-1969
museum_number_token
circ4211969
object_number
O129983
object_type
Sample
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Hand-woven textile sample.
place
Dessau
primary_image_id
2006AM3647
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This sample is fourth top right hand textile swatch in this image. It was made as a prototype for a furnishing fabric or wallcovering by Gunta Stölz at the Bauhaus between 1927 and 1930. The Weimar Bauhaus was an institution founded by Walter Gropius (1883-1969) to train architects, artists and industrial designers and it adopted the medieval guild structure as a model. Pupils therefore progressed through different stages: from apprentice, to journeyman, to assistant master and finally to master, thus qualifying for a place on the Council. The Weaving Workshop was the only workshop to consist entirely of female students, and had low status in the organisation, despite the fact that the dyers and weavers brought in considerable income. Gunta Stölz (1897-1983) was by 1926 the only woman on the Bauhaus Masters' Council (of 13). In 1928 the new director, Hannes Meyer, set out to make the workshops commercially productive and their output socially responsible. He urged the Weaving Workshop to develop prototypes for manufacture rather than continue making hand-crafted pictorial experiments (their previous output). These samples reflect the shift and the increasing demand for sample fabrics from textile mills in Germany and abroad. Such demand led to the establishment of the Bauhausstoffe (Bauhaus Fabrics) brand. These samples show the new possibilities that had opened up through the use of new machinery and artistically influenced experimentation with synthetic materials, including cellophane.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
sample-gunta-stolzl
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1931
year_start
1929