No Title

2010ek2024 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1897 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
A F Kendrick, Catalogue of Textiles From Burying-Grounds in Egypt, Vol II, London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1920, p.88, catalogue no.592
collection_code
T&F
credit
Given by the Egyptian Exploration Fund
date_end
0220-12-31
date_start
0050-01-01
date_text
050-220 AD (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Length: 21.5 cm approx., Width: 8.4 cm approx, Height: 10 cm approx.
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Excavated from Christian burial grounds in the late Roman city of Oxyrynchus (now known as al-Bahnasa) during excavations by the Egypt Exploration Fund during the winter of 1896/7. Historical significance: This is an important example of single-needle knitting, the technique thought to pre-date true (double-needle) knitting. The only example in the V&A's collections with ribbing in this technique.
id
100740
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T02:23:22.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T02:23:22.000Z
latitude
26.69636
location
In Storage
longitude
30.246469
marks
materials
wool
materials_techniques
Wool, single-needle knitted
museum_number
1936-1897
museum_number_token
19361897
object_number
O128867
object_type
Sock
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
A sock with big toe worked separately from the others, single-needle knitted in purple wool (dyed with red and blue dyes). It has a narrow 'tongue' at the front of the ankle, laced to the rest of the sock. There is one inch of ribbing at the top of the sock and the heel is shaped. The guage is 9 stitches and 12 rows per inch.
place
Egypt
primary_image_id
2010EK2024
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Before the technique of knitting with two needles evolved, textiles with a very similar structure and texture were created by a technique known as ‘single-needle knitting’. This sock, made in this method, was intended to be worn with sandals, as the big toe is shaped separately from the other toes. It was excavated from Christian burial grounds of the late Roman period, found in the present-day city of al-Bahnasa in Egypt. This used yarn threaded through the eye of a sewing needle worked in the round through a series of loops. It was much more laborious and slower than knitting with two needles, as the yarn could only be worked in short lengths. Extra pieces of yarn had to be spliced on as the ‘knitting’ progressed.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
sock-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
single-needle knitting
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
220
year_start
50