Aureus of Antonius Pius

2009cc5561 jpg l

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Acquired in 1910 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
'Salting Bequest (A. 70 to A. 1029-1910) / Murray Bequest (A. 1030 to A. 1096-1910)'. In: List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum (Department of Architecture and Sculpture). London: Printed under the Authority of his Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Limited, East Harding Street, EC, p. 113
collection_code
SCP
credit
Bequeathed by Mr George Salting
date_end
0143-12-31
date_start
0140-01-01
date_text
140-143 AD (made)
descriptive_line
Coin (aureus), gold, of Antonius Pius / Jupiter, Roman, ca. 140-143 AD
dimensions
Diameter: 1.9 cm, Weight: 7.11 g
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Medieval and Renaissance, room 8
historical_context_note
The coin bears the head of Emperor Antoninus Pius, whose full title was: Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius. He was born Sept. 19, 86AD at Lanuvium, Latium and died on March 7 161AD at Lorium, Etruria. He was Roman emperor from 138–161AD. Of Gallic origins, he served as consul (120) before being assigned judicial administrative duties in Italy. He later governed the province of Asia (c. 134). He became an adviser to Hadrian and in 138 was made Hadrian's heir. On accession he had the deceased emperor declared a god; for such dutiful acts he was named Pius (“Pious”). He quelled rebellions in Britain and other provinces and built the Antonine Wall. Mild-mannered and capable, he was the fourth of the “five good emperors” who guided the empire through an 84-year period (96–180) of internal peace and prosperity. Stator was a surname of Jupiter, the supreme ruler of the gods and mortals and the chief of the twelve Olympians. All the powers and functions of divinity were embodied in him. Like his Greek counterpart, Zeus, he was worshiped as a sky god. With Juno and Minerva he was a member of the triad of deities traditionally believed to have been introduced into Rome by the Etruscans. Jupiter was associated with treaties, alliances, and oaths; he was the protecting deity of the republic and later of the reigning emperor. His oldest temple was on the Capitoline Hill in Rome. He was worshiped on the summits of hills throughout Italy, and all places struck by lightning became his property. His sacred tree was the oak.
historical_significance
history_note
Salting bequest.
id
100562
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T02:22:40.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T02:22:40.000Z
latitude
41.903111
location
Medieval and Renaissance, room 8, case 2
longitude
12.49576
marks
'ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P COS III' Antoninus Augustus Pius, Father of his People with power as Tribune and Consul for the third time. 'IOVI STATORI' Jupiter
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold
museum_number
A.684-1910
museum_number_token
a6841910
object_number
O128637
object_type
Coin
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Small gold coin. The obverse features a portrait of Antoninus Pius and an inscription; the reverse Jupiter Stator, standing naked, leaning on a shaft and holding a thunderbolt, with an inscription. A border of dots encircles the images on each side.
place
Rome
primary_image_id
2009CC5561
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This coin bears the head of Emperor Antoninus Pius (AD 86–161) and images of the Roman god Jupiter. The presence of a powerful deity on a coin lent authority to the emperor. Jupiter appears as a protector. Stator was a surname of Jupiter, the supreme ruler of the gods and mortals and the chief of the twelve Olympians. All the powers and functions of divinity were embodied in him. Like his Greek counterpart, Zeus, he was worshiped as a sky god. With Juno and Minerva he was a member of the triad of deities traditionally believed to have been introduced into Rome by the Etruscans. Jupiter was associated with treaties, alliances, and oaths; he was the protecting deity of the republic and later of the reigning emperor. His oldest temple was on the Capitoline Hill in Rome. He was worshiped on the summits of hills throughout Italy, and all places struck by lightning became his property. His sacred tree was the oak. The aureus was an ancient Roman gold coin, issued from around the 1st century BC up to the 4th century AD. One aureus was worth 25 silver denarii. The denarius was a small silver coin and the principal silver coin issued in the ancient Roman currency system from the late 3rd century BC until the early 3rd century AD.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
aureus-of-antonius-pius-coin-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Aureus of Antonius Pius
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
143
year_start
140