No Title

2006al3654 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1889 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Crowe, Yolande, Persia and China: Safavid Blue and White Ceramics in the Victoria & Albert Museum (1501-1738) (London : Thames and Hudson, 2002): cat.no.78, p.86 Lane, Arthur. Later Islamic Pottery. London: Faber and Faber, 1957. 133p., ill. Pages 98-99, plate 75A
collection_code
MES
credit
date_end
1700-12-31
date_start
1600-01-01
date_text
17th century (made)
descriptive_line
Blue-and-white ewer, Iran, 17th century.
dimensions
Height: 22.4 cm, Width: 19.5 cm maximum
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Islamic Middle East, room 42
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
10041
label
Blue-and-white Ewer Iran 1600-1700 Imported Chinese ceramics and local metalwork had long provided Iranian potters with models for their wares. They continued to do so during the Safavid period. Both sources can be detected in this ewer. It has the same shape as the brass ewer beside it, while the blue-and-white decoration imitates that on Chinese porcelain. Fritware painted under the glaze Museum no. 618-1889 [Jameel Gallery]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:53:53.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:53:53.000Z
latitude
32.42065
location
Islamic Middle East, room 42, case 9E
longitude
53.682362
marks
materials
stonepaste
materials_techniques
Stonepaste with underglaze blue and white decoration
museum_number
618-1889
museum_number_token
6181889
object_number
O79409
object_type
Ewer
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Ewer, with conical bulbous shape, arched handle and spout in the form of a dragon's head. Fritware decorated in underglaze blue with Chinese style designs of human figures, fabulous monsters and a flight of storks around the shoulder. Iran (Safavid), first half 17th century.
place
Iran
primary_image_id
2006AL3654
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This ceramic ewer shows how Iranian potters used both imported Chinese ceramics and local metalwork as models for their work. The piece has the same decorative shape as some contemporary brass ewers. However, the blue-and-white decoration, with its dragons, storks and monsters, imitates that seen on Chinese porcelain. Iranian potters had long drawn on both sources for models for their wares. They continued to do so during the Safavid period (1501-1722), when this piece was made.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ewer-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
underglazing
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1700
year_start
1600