Green Bittersweet

2006bk7891 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2006 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Messel, Oliver Hilary Sambourne
attributions_note
bibliography
Pinkham, Roger (ed.) Oliver Messel: an exhibition held at the Theatre Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, 22 June - 30 September 1983. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1983. 200p., ill ISBN 0905209508)
collection_code
T&P
credit
Acquired with the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund, The Art Fund and the Friends of the V&A.
date_end
1959-12-31
date_start
1953-01-01
date_text
1953-1959 (designed)
descriptive_line
'Green Bittersweet' textile design by Oliver Messel for Sekers, silk manufacturer, 1953 or 1959.
dimensions
Height: 37.9 cm, Width: 25.1 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Lord Snowdon, Oliver Messel's nephew, inherited Messel's theatre designs and other designs and artefacts. The designs were briefly stored in a disused chapel in Kensington Palace before being housed at the V&A from 1981 on indefinite loan. The V&A Theatre Museum purchased the Oliver Messel collection from Lord Snowdon in 2005.
id
100163
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T02:20:54.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T02:20:54.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
In Storage
longitude
-0.12714
marks
materials
paper, ink, watercolour, gouache, charcoal
materials_techniques
Charcoal, gouache, watercolour and ink on paper
museum_number
S.431-2006
museum_number_token
s4312006
object_number
O128140
object_type
Textile design
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Green Bittersweet, a design for a silk brocade pattern in charcoal, watercolour and ink.
place
London
primary_image_id
2006BK7891
production_note
Possibly designed for the 'Coronation Collection', 1953, or possibly later, 1959. Reason For Production: Commission
production_type
Design
public_access_description
Great Britain’s leading theatre designer from the early 1930s to the mid 1950s, Oliver Messel (1904-1978) won international acclaim for his lavish, painterly and poetic designs informed by period styles. His work spans ballet, drama, film, musical, opera and revue. Messel’s traditional style of theatre design became unfashionable from the mid 1950s onwards, and he increasingly concentrated on painting, interior and textile design, including designing luxury homes in the Caribbean. In addition to his work as a theatre designer, Messel designed textiles for the silk making firm Sekers based in Whitehaven, Cumbria. Sir Nicholas Sekers, the owner of the silk mill and a great supporter of the theatre, regularly supplied the Royal Opera House and Glyndebourne with fabrics and met Messel in the early 1950s. Both men shared a belief in exquisite craftsmanship and attention to detail. Messel’s contemporary artists, Cecil Beaton (1904-1980) and Graham Sutherland (1903-1980), also designed fabrics for the Firm. To celebrate the Coronation of Elizabeth I in 1953, Sekers commissioned Messel to design silk brocade patterns, known as the ‘Coronation Collection’. Messel also created designs for taffeta in 1959.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
green-bittersweet-textile-design-messel-oliver-hilary
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
painting (image-making), drawing (image-making)
title
Green Bittersweet
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1959
year_start
1953